Now Playing Tracks

The Lone Arranger

By Emily Venemon

image

Nesting colony on Sand Island, a part of Midway Atoll NWR. Photo credit: David Patte/USFWS

I never thought I would end up working for an organization like the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, let alone being allowed to travel to places like Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Talk about a change of scenery. I spent my first week on Midway Atoll NWR feeling like I was in a strange (but pleasant!) dream. The sheer volume of and accessibility to wildlife there is overwhelmingly amazing. It is beautiful, but also heartbreaking. Life and death are equally visible.

image

A red-tailed tropic bird and its chick on Midway Atoll NWR. Photo credit: David Patte/USFWS

One day a volunteer pointed out to me an adorable Red-tailed tropicbird chick tucked up underneath its parent. A few minutes later she showed me a Laysan duck that had died of avian botulism. I loved watching the albatross chicks flap their wings; I wanted all of them to grow up healthy and fly out to sea. Every day I saw birds that had died of dehydration, plastic ingestion, and other maladies, however. On Midway Atoll NWR, the struggle for life in the face of natural and man-made adversities is present in a way I have never seen anywhere else.

Read More

By Richard Hannan, Deputy Regional Director - Pacific Region 
If you’re like me, you spend most of the day inside. I’m more often reading documents, listening to briefings, and enjoying the beautiful Pacific Region from my window. 
Often, I live vicariously through the conservation successes of the Service and our partners that I hear about throughout my day.
However, living vicariously through others is not enough for me so on my days off, my wife and I roam the Pacific Northwest.  This past weekend, my wife and I camped on the Oregon coast. While there, we enjoyed one of the most unique refuges in the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
We watched the birds soar in splendor over the islands, rocks,islets, and headlands of the Oregon Islands NWR - proud that the Service plays an important role in conserving these places for future generations of Americans to enjoy.
From nearly every viewpoint on the Oregon coast, colossal rocks can be seen jutting out of the Pacific Ocean creating postcard images. Each of these rocks is protected as part of Oregon Islands NWR. The refuge includes 1,853 rocks, reefs and islands and two headland areas and spans 320 miles of the Oregon coast. Learn more.
Photo credit: Ocean City Rocks at sunset- Gray Winkler; all other photos - Richard Hannan/USFWS
Zoom Info
By Richard Hannan, Deputy Regional Director - Pacific Region 
If you’re like me, you spend most of the day inside. I’m more often reading documents, listening to briefings, and enjoying the beautiful Pacific Region from my window. 
Often, I live vicariously through the conservation successes of the Service and our partners that I hear about throughout my day.
However, living vicariously through others is not enough for me so on my days off, my wife and I roam the Pacific Northwest.  This past weekend, my wife and I camped on the Oregon coast. While there, we enjoyed one of the most unique refuges in the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
We watched the birds soar in splendor over the islands, rocks,islets, and headlands of the Oregon Islands NWR - proud that the Service plays an important role in conserving these places for future generations of Americans to enjoy.
From nearly every viewpoint on the Oregon coast, colossal rocks can be seen jutting out of the Pacific Ocean creating postcard images. Each of these rocks is protected as part of Oregon Islands NWR. The refuge includes 1,853 rocks, reefs and islands and two headland areas and spans 320 miles of the Oregon coast. Learn more.
Photo credit: Ocean City Rocks at sunset- Gray Winkler; all other photos - Richard Hannan/USFWS
Zoom Info
By Richard Hannan, Deputy Regional Director - Pacific Region 
If you’re like me, you spend most of the day inside. I’m more often reading documents, listening to briefings, and enjoying the beautiful Pacific Region from my window. 
Often, I live vicariously through the conservation successes of the Service and our partners that I hear about throughout my day.
However, living vicariously through others is not enough for me so on my days off, my wife and I roam the Pacific Northwest.  This past weekend, my wife and I camped on the Oregon coast. While there, we enjoyed one of the most unique refuges in the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
We watched the birds soar in splendor over the islands, rocks,islets, and headlands of the Oregon Islands NWR - proud that the Service plays an important role in conserving these places for future generations of Americans to enjoy.
From nearly every viewpoint on the Oregon coast, colossal rocks can be seen jutting out of the Pacific Ocean creating postcard images. Each of these rocks is protected as part of Oregon Islands NWR. The refuge includes 1,853 rocks, reefs and islands and two headland areas and spans 320 miles of the Oregon coast. Learn more.
Photo credit: Ocean City Rocks at sunset- Gray Winkler; all other photos - Richard Hannan/USFWS
Zoom Info

By Richard Hannan, Deputy Regional Director - Pacific Region 

If you’re like me, you spend most of the day inside. I’m more often reading documents, listening to briefings, and enjoying the beautiful Pacific Region from my window. 

Often, I live vicariously through the conservation successes of the Service and our partners that I hear about throughout my day.

However, living vicariously through others is not enough for me so on my days off, my wife and I roam the Pacific Northwest.  This past weekend, my wife and I camped on the Oregon coast. While there, we enjoyed one of the most unique refuges in the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

We watched the birds soar in splendor over the islands, rocks,
islets, and headlands of the Oregon Islands NWR - proud that the Service plays an important role in conserving these places for future generations of Americans to enjoy.

From nearly every viewpoint on the Oregon coast, colossal rocks can be seen jutting out of the Pacific Ocean creating postcard images. Each of these rocks is protected as part of Oregon Islands NWR. The refuge includes 1,853 rocks, reefs and islands and two headland areas and spans 320 miles of the Oregon coast. Learn more.

Photo credit: Ocean City Rocks at sunset- Gray Winkler; all other photos - Richard Hannan/USFWS

By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info
By Megan Nagel
The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 
Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.
These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.
After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”
Photo credit: USFWS
Zoom Info

By Megan Nagel

The Pacific Regional Office celebrated Take Your Child to Work Day on April 25, 2012. 

Jackie told me she was proud of her dad because he, “…helped to save the animals.” Audrianna told me she wanted to be a marine biologist and is inspired by her mother.

These kids were a big help around the office, but their presence also reminded me that the work we do at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is for the future of fish, wildlife and also, our families.

After yesterday, I keep thinking, “What do I want my conservation legacy to be?”

Photo credit: USFWS

Senator Daniel K. Inouye Lighthouse: Celebrating 100 years and an American icon

image

The Daniel K. Inouye Kīlauea Point Lighthouse on Kīlauea Point NWR. Photo credit: Scott Hanft

By Megan Nagel

Recently, I’ve had the privilege to work on a wonderful effort - the Kīlauea Point Lighthouse, part of the Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge on the island of Kauai in Hawaii, was renamed in honor of the late Senator Daniel K. Inouye in April 2013.

An American hero on the battlefield, Senator Inouye represented Hawai‘i for over 50 years. He was a beacon for generations of people and for conservation issues, working to reauthorize the Coral Reef Conservation Act that protect the unique, beautiful ecosystems of Hawai‘i and to conserve special places like Kīlauea Point NWR and the lighthouse.

For over 100 years, the Kīlauea Point Lighthouse has been a beacon for the island of Kauai and the community of Kīlauea. Guiding ships safely and standing tall as a link between the islands past, present and future.

The Kīlauea Point Lighthouse will be re-dedicated the Daniel K. Inouye Kīlauea Point Lighthouse in a special ceremony on Saturday, May 4, 2013 on the Kīlauea Point NWR.

The rededication ceremony will also celebrate the centennial birthday and recently completed restoration of the lighthouse. It is part of a week-long series of events in the town of Kīlauea and at Kīlauea Point NWR. The restoration effort took three years and is a result of the hard work of refuge staff and the members of the refuge friends group, the Kīlauea Point Natural History Association. Thanks to the restoration efforts, public tours of the lighthouse will be available for the first time in years during the centennial celebration.

Regarding the renaming, the late Senator Inouye’s wife Irene Hirano Inouye said, “Dan placed a high priority in preserving pristine lands throughout Hawai‘i to ensure that future generations are able to enjoy what we oftentimes take for granted. Dan and I visited the Kīlauea Point Lighthouse a few years ago and were taken by the overwhelming community support for its preservation.  It was a beautiful evening, and the success achieved is testament to what is possible when everyone pitches in. Dan’s grandparents arrived on the island of Kaua‘’i at the turn of the 1900’s to begin a new life.  It is most fitting that the Department of the Interior’s site which will bear his name is on the island where it all began.”   

Read More

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union